Erdogan Should Not Erase Turkey’s Christian Past

Abrahamic religions is a right regulated by law. In November a court sentenced an alleged supporter of ISIS to death for the fatal stabbing of an year-old Christian doctor in September In April a military court sentenced 36 people to death for Coptic church bombings in Cairo, Alexandria, and Tanta in and that killed more than 80 persons. Under a law issued to legalize unlicensed churches and facilitate the construction of new churches, the government reported having issued licenses to existing but previously unlicensed churches and related support buildings out of 5, applications for licensure, and authorized the building of 14 new churches since September Local authorities frequently responded to sectarian attacks against Christians through binding arbitration sessions rather than prosecuting perpetrators of violence, leading to complaints by members of the Coptic community. In December President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi issued a decree creating the Supreme Committee for Confronting Sectarian Incidents, tasked with devising a strategy to prevent sectarian incidents and to address them as they occur, applying all relevant laws. The Ministry of Awqaf Islamic Endowments continued to issue required certifications to imams, and register and license all mosques. In May, based upon a policy, the ministry announced a ban on imams from Friday preaching at 20, small prayer rooms zawiyas used as mosques.

Interfaith relations between Christianity and Islam in Ethiopia

An interfaith marriage is defined by most Christian denominations as a marriage between a Christian and a non-Christian, whereas an interdenominational marriage is between members of two different Christian denominations. Denominations may use “interfaith” for both cases, or disagree over whether another group is a Christian denomination or a non-Christian religion. Some denominations forbid interfaith marriage, basing this ban on New Testament verse 2 Corinthians [1] [2] and the Old Testament verse Deuteronomy see also Ezra 9—

It is permissible for a Muslim man to marry a Christian or a Jewish woman without the need for her to convert to Islam at any time. Although this is permissible.

This weekend marks 20 years since the Srebrenica massacre — the killing of 7,, Muslim men and boys by Bosnian Serb forces in a Bosnian town that had been designated a United Nations safe haven. The war was fought largely along ethno-religious lines , among predominantly Orthodox Christian Serbs, Muslim Bosniaks and Catholic Croats.

The massacre continues to stir political passions today. On Wednesday, Russia vetoed a U. And a Pew Research Center survey of Muslims conducted in late found indications of both understanding and tension between Muslims and Christians in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Amid these signs of interfaith tolerance and engagement, however, community divisions remain. Similarly, few Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina are comfortable with the idea of their son or daughter marrying outside the faith.

Elsewhere in the region, openness to marrying outside the faith is higher.

Orthodox Christian Women Vs. Muslim Women

Islam is one of the major world religions with an estimated 1. The name Islam comes from an Arabic term meaning submission , a reference to the central belief that the goal of religion, or of a true believer, is submission to God’s will. Adherents of Islam are referred to as Muslims. Islam teaches that God in Arabic, Allah revealed his direct word and commands for mankind to Muhammad c. Despite admitting the ministry of prophets earlier than Muhammad, Islam asserts that the primary written record of God’s revelation to humankind is the Qur’an, which Muslims believe to be flawless, immutable, and the final revelation of God.

Most of the time, Gondaré Muslims and Orthodox Christians coexist without issues, engaging in practices that construe intergroup relations as harmonic. They also.

The Oromo, the largest single national group in Ethiopia, follow Islam and Christianity since the middle of the 19th Century particularly after the conquest of the Ethiopian State, which triggered, directly or indirectly, a massive conversion. On one the hand, it is in contradiction with many aspects of the pre-existing culture such as Gadaa-Qaaluu and other values from which the nationalists try to take inspiration to build their future.

On the other hand, from the strategic perspective, the adoption of Islam or Christianity as an ideological tool of their nationalism would be a factor of more division and fragmentation. Thus Oromo mainstream nationalism is evolving on a secular political trajectory. Many of them were converted to Islam, some have embraced Christianity, whereas there are still some that remain faithful to their indigenous religion. Most conversions to the two monotheist religions took place after the conquest of Abyssinia, although there are some groups whose conversion antedates this encounter, as a reaction to imperial subjugation.

It will be argued that the roots of Oromo nationalism are not in Christianity and Islam—often reputed, in the Ethiopian context, to be the establishment religion and the anti-establishment religion respectively. Neither the driving force nor the future political agenda can be based on religious dogma.

Public Orthodoxy

Polling and Analysis. Concentrated in Europe, Orthodox Christians have declined as a percentage of the global population, but Ethiopian community is highly observant and growing. Over the last century, the Orthodox Christian population around the world has more than doubled and now stands at nearly million. In Russia alone, it has surpassed million, a sharp resurgence after the fall of the Soviet Union.

Yet despite these increases in absolute numbers, Orthodox Christians have been declining as a share of the overall Christian population — and the global population — due to far faster growth among Protestants, Catholics and non-Christians.

Alex is expected to marry a good Greek Orthodox girl, whilst Eve is arranged to marry a Lebanese Muslim man, and the pair attempt to stop.

October 1, Length: In this two-part interview Kevin’s guest is “George,” who became a Sunni Muslim at age 14 and studied to become an Imam at a madrasa, studying Quran, Arabic language, Islamic theology, hadith, and jurisprudence. He left Islam and became an Orthodox Christian 20 years later. Among other things, Kevin and his guest discuss Islamic theology, common misunderstandings of Christianity by Muslims, differences between “orthodox” Islam and the Nation of Islam, the true understanding and practice in Islam of slavery and jihad, and the extraordinary journey that led “George” to Orthodox Christianity.

Kevin: Welcome and thank you for joining me on this edition of Ancient Faith Today. You know there is a lot coming from the media and news about Islam these days. In this two part series of which this is part one, I will be discussing Islam and the personal experiences of a recent convert to the Eastern Orthodox Church. Learned the Arabic language and memorised a percentage of the Quran in Arabic. George it is wonderful to welcome you to Ancient Faith Today.

George: Yes I did. I researched some of the eastern spiritual traditions such as Buddhism and Hinduism. I also read a bit of Greek philosophy, in particular the school of stoicism. I quickly lost interest in both Hinduism and Buddhism though, even as a kid of 12 or 13 who was pretty open minded, these two beliefs systems were just a little too out there for me.

Young Ethiopian Christians ‘bribed’ to convert to Islam, says charity

Ethiopia is now the second most populous country in Africa, with more than million inhabitants, after Nigeria, million. On both western and eastern sides of the continent, these two countries present situations of religious plurality reflective of the variety of historical dynamics of Christianity and Islam in Africa. In Nigeria the population is almost equally divided between Christians in the southern tropical humid regions and Muslims in the northern, drier, parts.

The Christian faith was introduced by missionaries who went along the processes of settlement of European colonial rule, whereas Islam was established in earlier times, since the 11th century, along the trade and slavery roads going through the Sahelian southern fringe of the Sahara desert 1.

Interfaith marriage, sometimes called a “mixed marriage”, is marriage between spouses Orthodox Judaism refuses to accept intermarriage, and tries to avoid Some Christian denominations forbid interfaith marriage, citing 2 Corinthians 6:​14 While Islamic Law permits a Muslim man to marry up to four women, the.

In the Orthodox Church it is not permitted for an Orthodox Christian to be married to an individual who has not been baptized, regardless of whether they are of the Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, or other faith. While there is generally no exception to this rule, especially in the USA, you may wish to discuss your particular circumstance with your parish priest, who can offer specific guidance tailored to your individual situation.

Especially against the Jewish people from whom all Christianity is derived. The practice of the Church is not a matter of discrimination any more than the practice of the Jewish faith, which only permits practicing Jews to celebrate their bar mitzvah, or the practice of the Buddhist faith, which allows only practicing Buddhists to enter Buddhist monastic orders, are cases of discrimination. It is a matter of sacramentology, as well as common sense. Simply put, one who has not entered the life of the Church through Baptism, Chrismation, and the Eucharist—and who as such does not acknowledge Jesus Christ as his or her Lord, God and Savior—would reduce the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony to pure external form or ritual since he or she, by not acknowledging Jesus Christ, cannot properly seal his or her marriage in Him.

In other words, marriage in Jesus Christ presumes that one accepts Him and believes in Him. Why would an individual who does not accept Christ want to seal his or her marriage in Christ? A non-baptized individual who truly desires to partake of the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony in the Orthodox Church should do so out of a desire to seal all he or she does in Jesus Christ.

It is inconceivable that one would pledge their love to another person in the name and presence of a God he or she does not believe in. If the Orthodox Church forces its members to marry outside the church, will it recognize the marriage?

When Muslims and Christians Marry

Interfaith marriage , sometimes called a ” mixed marriage “, is marriage between spouses professing different religions. Although interfaith marriages are most often contracted as civil marriages , in some instances they may be contracted as a religious marriage. This depends on religious doctrine of the two party’s religions; some of which prohibit interfaith marriage, but others allow it in limited circumstances.

The Muslim marriage ceremony is fully legally binding, since a This has affected Coptic Orthodox Christians in particular, as their pope.

I never dreamed of having a big wedding, or even any wedding at all. When I met my now husband, he agreed that he would be happy eloping. But when the time came and we were getting married it became clear that the event was not for us but for our families — for each of us to introduce the people who had shaped our lives to our new spouse and for our families to get to know this new person. This ritual seemed especially important in light of the fact that we come from such different cultures.

My husband is a Kurdish Turk, raised Muslim. In the end, we had three weddings. The results went from utterly unrelatable to downright racist.

Daily coronavirus briefing

The article first appeared in Greek in the Cypriot periodical Prasini aspida , November , and in Russian on Pravoslavie. Mixed marriages between Christians and non-Christians began to be permitted on Cyprus after the sanctioning of marriages registered by government agencies, for which, as opposed to church marriages, differences in religion do not serve as an obstacle.

Mixed marriages are registered based upon a special document called the Matrimonial Causes Act, accepted in The majority of these women who enter into marriage with Muslims are completely uninformed about the particulars of Islamic traditions and customs of family life. Such limitations in Muslim law formulated in the Koran are explained by the secondary position of women with respect to men in Islam and the necessity of preventing them from changing religions.

Tareq is an Egyptian Muslim, while Howaida was a Coptic Christian. law, Christian men must convert to Islam to marry a Muslim woman.

Throughout the nearly fifteen centuries of Muslim-Christian encounter, individual adherents of both traditions often have lived peaceably with each other. At the same time, Muslim expansion into Christian territories and Christian imperialism in Muslims lands have fostered fear and ill-will on both sides. Repercussions from the Crusades continue to resound in the contemporary rhetoric employed by defenders of both faiths.

In recent years relations between Muslims and Christians across the globe have become increasingly polarized, fanned by anti-Islamic rhetoric and fearmongering. Old sectarian rivalries play out with serious consequences for minority groups, both Christian and Muslim. Conflicts in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and elsewhere for much of the 20th century were often labeled as ethnic, political, or ideological perpetuations of long-standing struggles over land, power, and influence.

These conflicts now tend to be labeled in accord with the specifically religious affiliation of their participants. It is difficult to imagine a time in history at which there is greater need for serious interfaith engagement than now. It is also important to understand the ways in which members of the two communities experience each other in specific areas of the world today, including the United States, taking note of efforts currently underway to advance interfaith understanding and cooperation.

The events of September 11, , and the resulting American invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, have led to ugly commentary reminiscent of medieval hyperbole. Right-wing evangelical rhetoric in the United States against Islam has been fueled by incidents of international terrorism involving Muslims, while the well-funded Islamophobia industry in the United States has been producing and distributing large amounts of anti-Muslim material.

American Muslims want to exercise their constitutional rights to free speech in expressing their objection to certain American foreign policies, at the same time that they fear the consequences of the Patriot Act and other acts they view as assaults on their civil liberties. Meanwhile other Americans are struggling to understand that the Muslims with whom they interact in businesses, schools, and neighborhoods are different from the Muslim extremists who are calling for ever more dire measures against the United States.

How Bosnian Muslims view Christians 20 years after Srebrenica massacre

The sacramental union of a man and a woman is performed in an Orthodox Church according to the liturgical tradition, and blessed by a Priest who is recognized as canonical authentic by the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia. These regulations apply to every Greek Orthodox Priest across Australia. He is obliged to observe them conscientiously. There must be no impediment regarding relationships according to the Canons of the Church and according to Civil Law.

In other words, the parties wishing to marry must not be related to each other.

Marriage legislation in Syria differs between Muslims, Christians and the Druze. A Christian women who marry Muslim men do not need to convert. Orthodox Church, rum urthudhuks in Arabic), with around , members, is the.

Alexandra: We exchanged our wedding vows in Egypt. When Khaled arrived in Germany we got married. As far as legality goes, our marriage was officially recognised through the state ceremony but we also had another ceremony in the mosque so he could be married before God. It was very important to him and I had no problem with it. What was important to me was that our marriage be recognised by the Church.

Alexandra: We signed a notarial marriage contract and in that contract are rules as to what would happen to the children should we separate. We also had to agree on a “morning gift” a gift that the husband gives the wife on the morning of the ceremony. All I asked for was a ring, I am financially secure enough. Khaled: At the mosque, a lot of women tried to talk Alexandra out of the idea but she stood by the ring. How does your relationship differ to one of other married German couples?

Do you have to adapt to a lot of things? Alexandra: It was difficult at first to distinguish what was normal for a new couple growing together and what was limited to religious and cultural reasons. It goes without saying that I gave up alcohol on my own free will and it wasn’t difficult. When guests come over, Khaled doesn’t want us to offer wine or anything.

Orthodox Christians and Islam in the Postmodern Age

Marriage is a Sacrament, a Mystery of the Orthodox Church, through which the union of man and woman is sanctified by God. The Orthodox marriage ceremony, the most ancient of Christian wedding rites, is steeped in ritual and symbolism, reflecting the theology of the Church. The rite is performed by a Priest who stands before an appropriately covered ceremonial table. It is placed in the middle of the Soleas area of the church, in front of the Holy Altar. The Betrothal Service with the official Blessing of the Rings, and 2.

He then recites the Litany in which he beseeches the Lord for the salvation of the Bride and Groom; to send down upon them perfect and peaceful love; to preserve them in steadfastness of faith; to bless them with a blameless life; to grant them an honourable marriage.

He was an Orthodox Christian and she was Muslim. According to both partners, they were “deeply in love with one another.” They both also felt.

This dissertation examines movements between harmonic and antagonistic modalities of Muslim-Christian relations in a context of increasing religious plurality. In Gondar, Ethiopia, an educational and symbolic center of Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity, the Muslim minority has recently sought increased public parity with the Christian majority, taking advantage of the unprecedented provisions for religious freedom in Ethiopia’s constitution.

These developments helped fuel an episode of open antagonism, and some violence, between Muslims and Orthodox Christians in They also work to manage latent antagonistic potentials through religious codes of silence, and are able to tolerate a mixture of affinity and vague antagonistic feeling for the religious other. This dissertation argues that religious rituals in Gondar have a role both in facilitating mutual recognition across religious boundaries and “revealing” latent antagonisms, thus fueling interreligious conflict.

The potential that is realized in any given situation depends in part on how Muslim and Orthodox rituals intersect—that is, how events and human actions bring different rituals onto the same scene, and whether or not this co-presence is seen as subversive to the high values the rituals perform.

MUSLIM/CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE EXPERIMENT